Planting by the Moon Gardening Calendar

Growing up in a farming community I remember seeing my grandfather get his Farmer’s Almanac every year.  I didn’t understand it as a kid but I do now after hearing him talk about when is the right time to plant his gardens of corn, okra, squash, etc.  Every year he always had more vegetables than our whole family could eat.  Since we are talking about raised bed gardening this calendar from the Farmer’s Almanac will help those of us in the South to know when to plant our favorite vegetables.

Our 2015 Planting by the Moon’s Phase” gardening calendar is a longtime Old Farmer’s Almanac tradition. According to this practice, cycles of the Moon affect plant growth.

See dates for Region 1 (southern states). Don’t know your region? Click here for map.

Note that these gardening regions are quite broad and based on an age-old formula; we also offer a different methodology that’s more personalized with our “Best Planting Dates” calendar here.

How to Read the “Planting by the Moon” Gardening Calendar

  • The “Moon Favorable” column gives the best planting dates based on the year’s Moon’s phases (Eastern Time). See our Moon Phase Calendar for the exact days of the new and full Moons.)
  • Plant vegetables that bear crops above ground during the light, or waxing, of the Moon: from the day the Moon is new to the day it is full. Plant vegetables that bear crops below ground during the dark, or waning, of the Moon: from the day after it is full to the day before it is new again.
  • The “Planting Dates” column gives the safe periods for planting in areas that receive frost. See our Frost Dates Calculator for first/last frost dates and the average length of the growing season in your area (U.S. only).
  • Aboveground crops marked *
  • (E) means early planting; (L) means late
  Planting Dates Moon Favorable
* Barley 2/15–3/7 2/18–3/5
* Beans (E) 3/15–4/7 3/20–4/4
(L) 8/7–31 8/14–29
Beets (E) 2/7–28 2/7–17
(L) 9/1–30 9/1–12, 9/28–30
* Broccoli (E) 2/15–3/15 2/18–3/5
(L) 9/7–30 9/13–27
* Brussels sprouts 2/11–3/20 2/18–3/5, 3/20
* Cabbage 2/11–3/20 2/18–3/5, 3/20
Carrots (E) 2/15–3/7 2/15–17, 3/6–7
(L) 8/1–9/7 8/1–13, 8/30–9/7
* Cauliflower (E) 2/15–3/7 2/18–3/5
(L) 8/7–31 8/14–29
* Celery (E) 2/15–28 2/18–28
(L) 9/15–30 9/15–27
* Collards (E) 2/11–3/20 2/18–3/5, 3/20
(L) 9/7–30 9/13–27
* Corn, sweet (E) 3/15–31 3/20–31
(L) 8/7–31 8/14–29
* Cucumbers 3/7–4/15 3/20–4/4
* Eggplants 3/7–4/15 3/20–4/4
* Endive (E) 2/15–3/20 2/18–3/5, 3/20
(L) 8/15–9/7 8/15–29
* Kale (E) 2/11–3/20 2/18–3/5, 3/20
(L) 9/7–30 9/13–27
Leeks 2/15–4/15 2/15–17, 3/6–19, 4/5–15
* Lettuce 2/15–3/7 2/18–3/5
* Muskmelons 3/15–4/7 3/20–4/4
* Okra 4/15–6/1 4/18–5/3, 5/18–6/1
Onion sets 2/1–28 2/4–17
* Parsley 2/20–3/15 2/20–3/5
Parsnips 1/15–2/4 1/15–19, 2/4
* Peas (E) 1/15–2/7 1/20–2/3
(L) 9/15–30 9/15–27
* Peppers 3/1–20 3/1–5, 3/20
Potatoes 2/10-28 2/10-17
* Pumpkins 3/7–20 3/20
Radishes (E) 1/21–3/1 2/4–17
(L) 10/1–21 10/1–11
* Spinach (E) 2/7–3/5 2/18–3/5
(L) 10/1–21 10/12–21
* Squashes 3/15–4/15 3/20–4/4
Sweet potatoes 3/23–4/6 4/5–6
* Swiss chard 2/7–3/15 2/18–3/5
* Tomatos 3/7–20 3/20
Turnips (E) 1/20–2/15 2/4–15
(L) 9/1–10/15 9/1–12, 9/28–10/11
*Watermelons 3/15–4/7 3/20–4/4
* Wheat, spring 2/15–28 2/18–28
* Wheat, winter 10/15–12/7 10/15–27, 11/11–25

 

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